Yesterday's Weapons Forums

Discussion of history's firearms
It is currently Tue Dec 12, 2017 12:00 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Info
PostPosted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 11:24 am 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 8:07 pm
Posts: 5184
Location: Far too close to the edge
http://war1812.tripod.com/

_________________

It's 5 o'clock and it's watermelon time.....................
because you can't drink beer & load rockets - TXPete







Come Visit New Philly Sports.com!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 3:28 pm 
Offline
Gunnery Sergeant
Gunnery Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:30 pm
Posts: 215
Location: Winnipeg, MB CANADA
The war started badly for the Americans as their attempts to invade Canada were repeatedly repulsed by General Isaac Brock commanding a small British force, composed largely of local militias and American Indian allies. The American strategy depended on use of militias, but they either resisted service or were incompetently led. Military and civilian leadership was lacking and remained a critical American weakness until 1814. New England opposed the war and refused to provide troops or financing. Financial and logistical problems plagued the American war effort.

Britain possessed excellent finance and logistics but the ongoing war with France had a higher priority, so in 1812-1813 adopted a defensive strategy. After the defeat of Napoleon in 1814 the British were able to send veteran armies to invade the U.S., but by then the Americans had learned how to mobilize and fight as well.

At sea the powerful Royal Navy instituted a blockade of the majority of the American coastline (allowing some exports from New England, which was trading with Britain and Canada in defiance of American laws.) The blockade devastated American agricultural exports, but helped stimulate local factories that replaced goods previously imported. The American strategy of using small gunboats to defend ports was a fiasco, as the British raided the coast at will. The most famous episode was a series of British raids on the shores of the Chesapeake Bay.

These raids included an attack on Washington D.C. that resulted in the burning of the White House, the Capitol, the navy yard and other public buildings, later called the "Burning of Washington".

The American strategy of sending out several hundred privateers to attack British merchant ships was more successful, and hurt British commercial interests, especially in the West Indies. Although few in number compared to the Royal Navy, the American Navy's heavy frigates prevailed in several one-on-one naval battles against British ships. The decisive use of naval power came on the Great Lakes and depended on a contest of building ships.

Ultimately, Americans won control of Lake Erie and thus neutralized western Ontario and cut the native forces off from supplies. The British controlled Lake Ontario, preventing any major American invasion. The Americans controlled Lake Champlain, and a naval victory there forced a large British invasion army to turn back in 1814.

The Americans destroyed the power of the native people of the Northwest and Southeast, thus securing a major war goal. The trade restrictions and impressment by the British had ended, removing another root cause of the war. Both nations eventually agreed to a peace that left the prewar boundaries intact.

In January 1815 after the Treaty of Ghent was signed but before the US Congress had received a copy to ratify, the Americans succeeded in defending New Orleans, and the British captured Fort Bowyer before news of the treaty reached the US south coast.

The war had the effects of both uniting Canadians and also uniting Americans far more closely than either population had been prior to the war. Canadians remember the war as a victory by avoiding conquest, while Americans celebrated victory in a "second war for independence" personified in the hero of New Orleans, Andrew Jackson.

_________________
Gerry
Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 07, 2008 11:41 pm 
Offline
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant

Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:21 am
Posts: 515
In the years preceeding the War The British and their Canadian subjects supplied Indian raiding parties with arms and safe haven from pursuit, the raids took the lives of hundreds of American settlers and Frontiersmen including entire families.
The Indians did the majority of the fighting along the Canadian Border, until there British Allies betrayed them and left them to be wiped out while the British "fired one volly and fled the field".

Despite revisionism the War was not fought over an invasion of Canada, Canada was a side issue, a thorn in our side.

The American Privateers did little damage to British shipping and most were captured or sunk early in their voyages.

According to "The Age of Fighting Sail" one American Figate captured enough British Gold on a single voyage to nearly pay for the entire US Naval Campaign, and US Naval vessels using the latest ship builder's technology , such as transverse bracing, and lighter and stronger masts and rigging, literally sailed circles around the less nimble British ships. Even the US Ship of the Line "the President" ,which American shipwrights considered a balky tub, out manuevered the best the British could field.

One problem the Brits had was their ships were getting old and losses to the French had resulted in ships being built with poorly seasoned timbers. The service life of vessels built at that time was less than a third that of ships built a generation earlier.

When the British snuck into Washington and burned a few buildings they cut and ran when they heard that an American force was on the way. A fortuitous rain put out most of the fires.
The British Officer in charge chose not to burn the US Patent Office, because the wonders he saw there convinced him that American Ingenuity would shape the world for centuries to come.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 6:42 am 
Offline
Master Sergeant
Master Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2007 6:31 am
Posts: 270
Location: South Florida
Every nation writes history from it's perspective and likes to pose themselves as being on the side of good and right. You have to remember this when you read "history."

The truth is often not documented by either side but reading both sides at least gives you a balance.

Here's an interesting link from the American perspective:

http://www.history.army.mil/books/AMH/AMH-06.htm

This comes from "OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF MILITARY HISTORY

UNITED STATES ARMY" and it covers most of the statements in the previous post - albeit from a different perspective giving a motive for some of the beliefs.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 6:55 pm 
Offline
Second Lieutenant
Second Lieutenant

Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2008 3:21 am
Posts: 515
From the link you provided.
Quote:
Origins of the War



The immediate origins of the war were seizure of American ships, insults and injuries to American seamen by the British Navy, and rapid expansion of the American frontier. The British outrages at sea took two distinct forms. One was the seizure and forced sale of merchant ships and their cargoes for allegedly violating the British blockade of Europe. Although France had declared a counterblockade of the British Isles and had seized American ships, England was the chief offender because its Navy had greater command of the seas. The second, more insulting, type of outrage was the capture of men from American vessels for forced service in the Royal Navy. The pretext for impressment was the search for deserters, who, the British claimed, had taken employment on American vessels.



The reaction in the United States to impressment differed from that aroused by the seizure of ships and cargoes. In the latter case the maritime interests of the eastern seaboard protested vigorously and demanded naval protection, but rather than risk having their highly profitable trade cut off by war with England they were willing to take an occasional loss of cargo. Impressment, on the other hand, presented no such financial hardship to the shipowners, whatever the consequences for the unfortunate seamen, and the maritime interests tended to minimize it.



To the country at large the seizure of American seamen was much more serious than the loss of a few hogsheads of flour or molasses. When a British naval vessel in June 1807 attacked and disabled the USS Chesapeake and impressed several members of the crew, a general wave of indignation rose in



123



which even the maritime interests joined. This was an insult to the flag, and had Jefferson chosen to go to war with England he would have had considerable support. Instead he decided to clamp an embargo on American trade. In New England scores of prosperous shipowners were ruined, and a number of thriving little seaports suffered an economic depression from which few recovered. While the rest of the country remembered the Chesapeake affair and stored up resentment against Britain, maritime New England directed its anger at Jefferson and his party.

Which explains this
Quote:
New England opposed the war and refused to provide troops or financing. Financial and logistical problems plagued the American war effort.

Many powerful actors in New England opposed war, not for any questions of morality but for purely selfish reasons. It cut into their profit margin.

Human Rights were a major factor in the motivation for an armed confrontation, and continued to be so throughout the conflict.
In one incident 23 American troopers were separated from their fellows after being captured by the British and sent to England to be tried and executed for Treason because they were born in Ireland.
American Commanders made it known that if these men were executed a like number of British POWs might share their fate, the Irish-Americans were released except for one who'd died in the British prison.

As for how the Man on the Street of Britain saw the war.
Quote:
The motive that controlled British policy was plainly revealed in an editorial article which appeared in the London Independent Whig (January 10th, 1813), after the war had been begun and the British public had been astounded by the capture of two or three of their finest frigates. "Accustomed, as we have hitherto been, to a long and uninterrupted tide of success upon the watery element, and claiming an absolute and exclusive sovereignty over the ocean, to be defeated there, where we securely rested our proudest hopes and wishes, might reasonably be expected to check our insolence and mortify our pride. In this view of the case, and if we could not flatter ourselves that it would have the effect of inducing us to abate somewhat of our unwarrantable pretensions, and listen to terms of moderation and forbearance, our regret would be sensibly diminished; since even the misfortune, severe as it is, might be converted into a great and lasting benefit to the nation at large. But the mischief will not confine itself here; the charm of the invincibility of the British navy, like that of the Grecian warrior, being destroyed, the terror that has long preceded our flag, and commanded the abject homage of surrounding nations, will henceforward be dissipated, and every maritime power with whom we may be involved in war will fight with redoubled zeal, ardently and anxiously hoping to lower our ascendancy and establish the freedom of the seas.'' That was it exactly; they were afraid somebody would establish the freedom of the seas, and at that time the Americans seemed most likely to do it.


http://www.thetroubleshooters.com/comet/1812war001.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Info
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 5:31 pm 
Offline
Gunnery Sergeant
Gunnery Sergeant
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 4:30 pm
Posts: 215
Location: Winnipeg, MB CANADA
Hi Guy's
The War of 1812 200 years this year how will it be remembered?
Cheers

_________________
Gerry
Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Info
PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 9:04 pm 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:26 am
Posts: 16237
Location: Minnesota , USA
not sure gerry ,

im going to admitt this is one area of our history that i am truely deficient in , other than the really common known facts and stories ,

i think it may have fallen short in my younger years of holding my interest but i think i cheated myself ,


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group