Yesterday's Weapons Forums

Discussion of history's firearms
It is currently Fri Feb 21, 2020 8:36 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Old cars seen in Vietnam
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 1:50 am 
Offline
Feldmarschall
Feldmarschall
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:48 am
Posts: 1051
Location: Washington state
When I was in Vietnam, once in a while I'd see an interesting old car and if I had a camera with me, I'd take a picture of it.

When I first went to Vietnam, I didn't know what to expect so I just took a cheap little Kodak fixed focus camera. It took, I think, 110 roll film. In case I was going to be knocking around and it got lost, it wouldn't be much of a loss. So my earliest pictures taken in my tour and a half are the square print format due to the 100 roll film. These were taken in Oct., 1970.

The following two show cars that were not old at the time, but for whatever reason I found them interesting. These were taken at the foot of Le Loi St. in downtown Saigon. The first one was taken in front of the USAID (Agency for Int'l Development) HQ building. There was always a fleet of US government cars out front, all black, and usually 66-67 Ford Fairlanes and 69 Falcons. That is Saigon city hall out back.

Image


The second picture was taken in this same neighborhood and the black car is a '67 Ford Fairlane. The RVN legislature building is in the distant background and you can see the ARVN soldier statue in front of it, which became kinda famous the day the Commies came to town in 1975 and toppled it. In 1971, you could walk through the little park the statue was located in and see all the small, plastic vials that had contained heroin that US servicemen had ingested while sitting on the benches.

Image


After I'd been in Vietnam for a while and was established in a +/- secure rear area, I had my parents send me my German 35mm camera and I used it until I bought a new Minolta SLR later, so most of the pictures are in the 35mm format.
I haven't cropped anything out of these because I wanted all the junk in the background to remain. My scanner, unbidden, did trim upper and lower edges on some prints

The picture below shows me standing next to a 1957 Lincoln Premiere in Vung Tau, taken in Feb., 1971.

Image


Below is a picture of the back end of a 1958 Edsel. Actually, I saw several '58 Edsels during my time there, not a rare car at the time. Note the license plate, that must've been assigned to a Citroen at one time because it has the dual chevrons emblem of that company separating the letter prefix from the numbers. The origins of that logo for the Citroen company is derived from the fact that Andre Citroen was the inventor of the herringbone helical gear pattern.

Image


The picture below was of a not-so-rare 1961 Ford four door sedan. It was taken circa 1970 outside of Long Binh Post and the roadway to the left is QL (National Highway) 1.

Image


This picture shows a car most Americans haven't heard of. This is a French Hotchkiss, about a 1955 model. This was made by the same company that made the famous Hotchkiss cannons and the emblem on the grill of this car had the crossed cannons for identification. The Vietnamese who were driving this car had suffered a break-down. In the custom of the time and place, they had jacked the car up right on the side of the road on QL-1 and had disassembled the differential on the spot.

Image


This is the Citroen Traction Avant, a very famous and numerous model in Vietnam as well as metro France and presumably her other former possessions. Our Vietnamese workers always simply referred to these as "Black Car" but I did see a few in grey.

Image


Now in this picture, you see a 1956 Ford Thunderbird. I didn't know at the time, but I guess this car was somewhat famous around Saigon. Some time after I returned, I was talking to a civilian contractor who'd done time there and he was familiar with the car and mentioned it's noteworthiness. Why it doesn't have the typical front bumper used on most '55 and '56 models, which have two prominent round adornments on the upper edge, I do not know. I've seen pictures of a few other Birds that had this simple, straight bumper so it was factory. Maybe made for export? Taken in 1970.

Image


One day in Jan., 1972 I was sitting at a restaurant at a major road junction. The following two pictures were taken where QL-13 originates in the south and goes north to Dau Tieng and An Loc. Soldiers in the Big Red One and the 25th Inf. Div. referred to QL-13 as "Thunder Road." The cars in these pictures were used as everyday taxis and were not uncommon. They show post-WW2 Ford and Plymouth sedans.

Image


Image


Now this last set of pictures pertains to "The Cadillac Story." Late in my time in Vietnam, around Jan. - Feb., 1972, I rode around a bit with our unit supply sergeant as my time was winding down. He had a weekly laundry run to Thu Duc and on the way, we passed through a village called Binh Trieu. On one such trip, I looked out the window of the Dodge M37 truck and spotted a 1953 Cadillac. My neighbors when I was growing up had one of these and it was a wonderful car. I asked Sergeant Kittel to stop so we could have a look. As a real adult now, I would never stop and start snooping around on private property in gooner country. Because I know better. But then, I didn't yet have the maturity nor common sense not to. We drove up the path to where this car was, and the building looked like a restaurant, which it was. The covered dining area was built out over a large pond. They were closed during the day as they did an evening trade. I got out of the truck and walked over to look at the Cadillac, which was partially covered with a tarp. By this time, two very healthy-looking young men came around with unfriendly demeanor. I don't think they spoke English, but when I gestured toward the car, they went back into the building. Shortly thereafter, a wizened old guy came out in his pajamas; he spoke some English. We talked about the car for a while. He told me it ran, but the battery was no good. He allowed me to open the hood and I could see that it was set up for a large, later battery. If you've been under the hood of these old Cadillacs, you'd know that they took a long, narrow battery that slipped down into a rather awkward compartment behind the right front wheel under the right hood hinge. Someone had fabricated a welded steel shelf and bolted it to the firewall to accept a more modern-sized battery. The man explained that batteries were rationed and he was unable to get one. He told me his name was Minh and he owned the car and the restaurant. As we were leaving, I told him that I'd see about getting him a battery and that we'd be back.

My assignment was with an ordnance battalion, and one of our missions (Project Keystone) was to ship military vehicles offshore for rebuild, etc. Vehicles to be shipped were to have all fuel, oils and lubricants removed, also all ammo, and the batteries (acid is corrosive). Consequently, we had an enormous pile of those big, square 12v batteries recently removed from 2-1/2 and 5 ton trucks. Each truck had two ganged in series to give 24v. They were big and heavy and had rope straps built in for hefting them around. Since most of the trucks were driven into the compound, you could figure that most of the batteries in this pile were good. So, on the day of the next laundry run, we drove by there and I kiped one.

We took the route through Binh Trieu and stopped at Minh's place on the way back. When he saw our truck, he came out right away. I gave him the battery and he was grateful to get it. Very soon there was free beer for us on the table in spite of their being closed for business.

The third time we stopped there, Minh had installed the battery, the car was uncovered and he'd been driving it. He turned out to be a kind of interesting old coot. In addition to his restaurant business, he owned a bicycle shop in Saigon. His claim to fame was that he'd been a champion breast stroke swimmer. He explained that he'd trained for the olympics, which was to be held in 1940 in Japan. Because WW2 had already started (for some of the world), the 1940 Olympic games were cancelled. However, the Japanese sponsored an East Asian Games in 1940 and it was there that he won a medal for the breast stroke.

Thereafter, it was free beer for us but since I was very short I didn't get to take full advantage of the reward.

'53 Cadillac when I first saw it.

Image


Picture taken after Minh got the car running again with the replacement battery.

Image


Sergeant Otto Kittel, Minh and I enjoying a cold one over the pond. Which, incedentally, was stocked with fish used by the restaurant. All the food waste from the establishment went into the pond and fattened up the fish for meals. Kittel a second enlistment soldier, who'd done a prior tour in Vietnam. He had a Colt Commando .38 in that shoulder holster. Nice jump boots, starched jungle fatigues. I was in my usual rumpled, crappy jungle fatigues, skinned-up, greasy issue boots only partially laced, needed a haircut, blah, blah.

Image


Same place, Kittel must've taken this picture. I've got my Smith & Wesson .38 revolver hanging from a GI pistol belt. I still have that gun; I brought it back in the bottom of my duffel bag. Note the brands of beer on the table, Carling Black Label and Vietnamese Beer 33.

Image


I haven't put any of these pictures up on the web before, and I know they'll turn up elsewhere now. It amazes me to do a search sometimes and see where some of my pictures have gone online. However, I don't resent it because sharing them is better than them dying in a scrapbook.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 3:57 am 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:26 am
Posts: 16876
Location: Minnesota , USA
we appreciate it gary , i always enjoy reading your posts and the photos supplement the enjoyment immensily , as always ive spent a great deal of time enjoying this one , great photos


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 10:59 am 
Offline
The Knife
The Knife
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 3:15 pm
Posts: 3407
Location: Bean town in the worthless nut state
Good post Gary. Always enjoy these type .

Rad

_________________
Image

NRA Benefactor Member
AMA Life Member
Tri-State Gun Collectors Life Member


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 12:08 pm 
Offline
Теперь предлагаем бесплатную ежедневную маммографию!
Теперь предлагаем бесплатную ежедневную маммографию!
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 05, 2007 9:04 pm
Posts: 8914
Location: On the couch a lot now that I'm retired
It's amazing how cars from America found their way to the other side of the world.

There was an economy Citroen model that was unique in that you had to remove a fender to change tires. Conveniently, the fender bolts were the same size as the lug nuts so the wrench/jack handle would cover the entire operation.

Not too many cars in Northern I Corps - just flocks of 'nifty 50s'. I doubt there was a car at all in Cam Lo. I think people took a bus to Dong Ha for stuff not found in the local market like gas for the Honda.

I don't know the world record for the most people on a Honda 50, but 5 was quite common. "Hang on tight, little Nguyen!" SW

Attachment:
50a.jpg
50a.jpg [ 10.97 KiB | Viewed 3657 times ]


Attachment:
50b.jpg
50b.jpg [ 161.07 KiB | Viewed 3657 times ]

_________________
Darkness is all around us and enemy are just beyond the perimeter.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jan 07, 2014 7:36 pm 
Offline
VA-75 Spook
VA-75 Spook
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 6550
Location: Ooooo-Hio
....I LOVE it... :Dbounce: ...mebbe we should make this a sticky here-or move it to the Vietnam section and sticky it there... ;)

....I should do one on the Italian ones from one of my later stints over there... :lol

_________________
....Naj puška govori!....
.............deplorable typical "bitter clinger"....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 12:26 am 
Offline
Gunnery Sergeant
Gunnery Sergeant

Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 11:03 pm
Posts: 207
Great story and pics! Thanks.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:33 am 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:26 am
Posts: 16876
Location: Minnesota , USA
glad to see so much interest , was starting to think this generation was going by the wayside as those before us , not necessarily forgotten but old and gray and not so noteworthy these days ,


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 08, 2014 1:36 pm 
Offline
Feldmarschall
Feldmarschall
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:48 am
Posts: 1051
Location: Washington state
The Citroen model that required the removal of the rear fender to change a tire was the DS series. These were not an economy model; that was the little 2CV Deux Chevaux ("Two Horses") that was made of flat sheet metal panels.

The DS was a semi-luxury car when introduced and became moreso over the years as it was continually developed. Citroen came out with many interesting design features in their cars and were known for innovation. For a time, they owned Maserati and using those assets came out with the SM model, here sometimes called the Citroen-Maserati, a marvelous machine.

By the way, the balance of the DS was such that when a rear wheel was removed, the car would stay upright and indeed could be driven that way on three wheels.

I was unable to find the picture I have of a 1956 Ford Sunliner convertible that was always parked in front of the Saigon VW dealer.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jan 15, 2014 1:02 am 
Offline
Lance Cpl
Lance Cpl

Joined: Wed May 22, 2013 2:20 pm
Posts: 25
Fascinating pictures! I admit I should know more about Nam, but I guess I know a bunch of other stuff instead.

Were the revolvers an issued sidearm? What branch were you?

_________________
See my Balkans collection on my website http://partisanrifles.weebly.com/, specializing in rifles with soldier graffiti.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:24 pm 
Offline
Feldmarschall
Feldmarschall
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:48 am
Posts: 1051
Location: Washington state
Branch, US Army. No, the revolvers were not issue for us. We bought them privately in-country. Being that we were in a rear area, we didn't carry our rifles around all the time. They were stored in the detachment arms room and were a hassle to check out. Having a private weapon was handier. One of the other guys in the detachment had a Colt Model 1917 which he figured was too awkward with a barrel length of six inches, so he hack-sawed off the barrel forward of the extractor rod so it would fit in his pocket better. I'm sure there was a USARV reg. against these privately owned firearms, but no attention was paid to it.

SGT Kittel's Colt was flaming bomb ordnance marked, so was not re-importable into the US from Vietnam. Also, it was Parkerized and that feature also nixed it as a take-home. My Smith & Wesson was of civilian origin, so I wrote to the ATF and got an import permit for it in case anyone challenged me about it on the way home. It was pretty well jungle-ridden when I first got it, having been confiscated from a VN civilian who was trying to smuggle it onto Long Binh Post for who knows what reason. The guy I bought it from had gotten it from the MP's. It cost me $30. The cylinder release latch was missing and the little spring that holds tension on the cylinder lock was broken. It was handy being in an ordnance unit; I looked up the guy in our battalion who was in charge of the small arms department and told him I needed some parts. He took me up to a loft in a big warehouse building, went to a certain footlocker and opened it up. It was full of revolvers that had been turned in by army aviation units standing down. He said, "Take whatever parts you need." All of the guns in the footlocker were in nice shape, so I just picked a Model 10 similar to mine and robbed it of the parts I needed. I started to put the donor revolver back together and the sergeant said, "Don't worry about that; just toss the parts back in," so that's what I did.

In the late 1970's, I basically ruined the barrel in this gun so I sent it back to the Smith & Wesson factory for rebuild. They put a new barrel on it and a bunch of other new parts inside. It looks like a new gun now. How did the barrel get ruint? A pal gave me some old British .380 revolver cartridges, which of course aren't right for this gun which is a .38 Special. Oddly enough, they would just barely squeeze into the chambers. This old ammo had cordite propellant and was giving hang-fires. One turned out to be a squib load that left a bullet in the barrel, then I fired it again and the barrel was toast -- big inside bulge. The British .380 has a slightly larger bullet (.360, IIRC) and that didn't help.

The S-2/3 office in our HQ had a small collection of communally-owned private firearms which we took out for shooting from time to time in library fashion. Ones I remember were a Thompson SMG with no buttstock on it; M2 US Carbine fully auto; M3A1 .45 caliber SMG ("Grease Gun"), and some foreign weapons that I don't remember and wasn't much interested in. One was a incredibly rusted Mauser K98k left over from the French period. I fired the M2 (fast cyclic rate, would run out of ammo quickly) and the M3 Grease Gun (very slow cyclic rate, "da-da-da-da"). The time I fired the M3, we were using .45 tracers and the fat slugs would hit the dirt, bounce off and sit there sizzling in the dirt for a little while before they would burn out.

When I arrived in the unit in mid-1970, the invasion of Cambodia had just been concluded and capture enemy ordnance was brought back from the border area and turned in to our ordnance people for de-mil and disposal. At one time, the small arms section had 55 gal. barrels with the ends cut off, all stuffed full of enemy long arms. You have to remember that these were the ones that were excess to what individual soldiers in the combat units wanted to take home, so they were mostly scuzzy things. Lots of SKS and Chinese Mosin-Nagants, the AK-47's turned in were unserviceable pieces (good ones were prized), and some former US Army types like M1 Rifles and Carbines. Some really poor Mausers of various origins. Etc.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 5:00 am 
Offline
First Lieutenant
First Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:17 am
Posts: 700
Location: Whitemouth R., up the Escarpment
The '61 Ford pictured is a hardtop.

I had one- it was my first car~ pre-XL, and pre-500. I think mine may have been a re-badged Canadian Mercury. Ford did some weird things with cross-over models during that time. At any rate, my '61 had the 126" wheel base, which had me suspecting Mercury. Old three on the tree, and double foot clutch. Mine lacked the chrome guards over the rear fenders. 223" big-six, aspirated by a single lunger holley. I'll never forget those rocket tail lamps, and the chrome tipped fins. It sat dead and dormant in my Dad's back yard for some 12 years. Sold it to a kid who put a small block chevy into it and used it for demo derby...

I drank much of that black label in my hidee-ho daze :fny: :fny: . It was bottled by Carling-O'Keefe right here in town, and it was cheep to be had. Our version neared 6% by volume~ heady stuff after a dozen or so... :crzy:

Regards,

Doc Sharptail

_________________
"Ain't no Half-Way" -S.R.V.

"Oh Yeah!.....All Right!" -Paul Simon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 11:16 am 
Offline
The Knife
The Knife
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 3:15 pm
Posts: 3407
Location: Bean town in the worthless nut state
Doc
My younger brother got hired at the local Ford engine plant and bought a new 61 Starliner with a 390 and three on the tree. It was black with red interior.

Rad

_________________
Image

NRA Benefactor Member
AMA Life Member
Tri-State Gun Collectors Life Member


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 11:53 am 
Offline
First Lieutenant
First Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:17 am
Posts: 700
Location: Whitemouth R., up the Escarpment
HerrMesser wrote:
Doc
My younger brother got hired at the local Ford engine plant and bought a new 61 Starliner with a 390 and three on the tree. It was black with red interior.

Rad


One of the local high schools is restoring a Star-liner- quite a car! I'll look and see if I can find on line details. If mine had been a Star-liner, I doubt I would have sold it...

Image

And here's what a properly restored '61 Star-liner should look like:

Image

Regards,

Doc Sharptail

_________________
"Ain't no Half-Way" -S.R.V.

"Oh Yeah!.....All Right!" -Paul Simon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 10:41 pm 
Offline
Brigadier General
Brigadier General
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 06, 2007 9:26 am
Posts: 16876
Location: Minnesota , USA
classic good looks , if i had a lot of disposable cash and time id be looking for something of this vintage ,


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2014 11:17 pm 
Offline
Feldmarschall
Feldmarschall
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:48 am
Posts: 1051
Location: Washington state
Yes, quite right, in my OP that's a four door hardtop, not a sedan. All the years I've had that picture I never paid enough attention to note the distinction.

Ford decided that their 1960 full-sized models hadn't sold well enough and they figured it must've had something to do with the styling. So in '61, they completely restyled the line while retaining the basic body structure of the 1960 models. That's why from the beltline up, they are identical, and of course the under structure as well. This resulted in minimum retooling expense.

1960 Fords were huge boxes. In the early '60's, my dad drove a 1955 Lincoln. Our neighbor, George, drove a 1960 Ford station wagon. One weekend, they were both out front talking, and I heard George say (he was generous with unsolicited advice) to my dad, "Why do you want to drive such a big car as that Lincoln? You ought to get something smaller like a Ford." The Lincoln was 214.1 inches long; George's '60 Ford was 213.7 inches. Not that you'd notice .4 inches.

Anyway, 1961 big Fords had a wheelbase of 119 inches; the full-size Mercury cars were an inch over at 120. Mercury marketing people were taking a different approach in 1961, going away from competing with Oldsmobile and targeting a lower-priced market. Hence, lots of commonality with Ford components.

Ford of Canada used products from both the Ford and Mercury lines to suit their market, slightly re-trimmed. Doc, I don't know what you had with that 126 inch wheelbase. Lincoln in '61 was 123 inches, doubt it was one of those with a 223 inch six!

Many years ago, I had a 1959 Ford cheapie 2 door sedan with a 223 six (sicks) and a three speed manual trans. Very sluggish. It was a poor choice for me, who was used to eight cylinder cars.

That Starliner hardtop design, I believe, was only used for two years, 1960 and '61. Discontinued in 1962 due to slow sales. Over the years, my styling preference was for the '61 over the '62.

When I was stationed at Fort Lost in the Woods, we had a new training NCO transfer in from Germany. He arrived without a car, so one of the first things he did was go down to auto row off post to get a cheap, used car. He didn't care anything about cars. He came back with a red '62 Ford. I went out to take a look at it, and noticed the "406" emblem on the fender; then I looked in the interior and saw a four speed gearshift on the floor. I went back into the orderly room and said something like, "Do you know what you've got there?" His reply was, "No, I just bought it because it was cheap and ran good."

Here's a picture that hasn't seen the light of day for a while. This one dates to 1961 when I was 11 years old. It's a picture of a '61 Ford with a Riviera Continental kit. It was a promo sent to the dealer where my dad worked at the time and he gave it to me. During the years approx. 1959-62, I kept a scrapbook of old car pictures , cutting them from magazines and so on. Originally, this was an 8x10 glossy B&W which I not so carefully cropped down with scissors to fit a page in my scrapbook.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 3:45 am 
Offline
First Lieutenant
First Lieutenant
User avatar

Joined: Tue Apr 06, 2010 4:17 am
Posts: 700
Location: Whitemouth R., up the Escarpment
That long wheel-base was a dearth of troubles for me. The drive shaft kept hitting the floor on bumpy roads. A set of EZ-spring helpers didn't do anything to cure the problem. I ended up with a new drive shaft, and a pillow-block bearing from a 5 ton truck drive shaft bolted to the frame under the floor.

I don't think it had any Lincoln in it's blood line- it simply wasn't put well together enough to be anywhere near Lincoln. I still suspect the frame was Mercury Montcalm.

Image

The other problem was in the carb- the little float bowl's float arm kept breaking off. Dunno if double clutch down-shifting to 2nd and punching the gas to pass on the highway had anything to do with it. A friend told me those old single bbl holley's could drain gas faster than the fuel pump could keep up with. I never noticed any performance problems with it~ it was pretty quick for a car that big and heavy. I do wish that I had kept that clutch return spring. It would have made a heck of an under lever spring piston air rifle- much faster than anything ever offered on the market ;)

There were a lot of Mercury's up here with that Continental factory kit. That's one of the very few I've seen on a Ford. I guess anything desirable was possible in the early sixties.

I still miss the chrome around the glass of the "For-door" hardtops. Only other Fords I've had were both Escorts- rebadged Mazda's, 84 and 85. Boringly reliable little putts with full synchromesh 5 speed transmissions. Nary a problem with those, other than they were so darned tiny... Been mostly a chevy guy over the years. Dabbled a bit in Mopars for a bit, but couldn't afford the continual break-downs.


Regards,

Doc Sharptail

_________________
"Ain't no Half-Way" -S.R.V.

"Oh Yeah!.....All Right!" -Paul Simon


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 10:23 am 
Offline
The Knife
The Knife
User avatar

Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 3:15 pm
Posts: 3407
Location: Bean town in the worthless nut state
Another car I wish I had kept was a 63 Galaxy convert. A former land lord gave it to as the clutch blew out the bell housing and some ears of the tranny. It was a 260 V8 with three on the tree. Picked up a 64 4 door with 289 and three speed then did a swap. End up trading it in on a gremlen when the first gas crises started.

Rad

_________________
Image

NRA Benefactor Member
AMA Life Member
Tri-State Gun Collectors Life Member


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:45 pm 
Offline
Feldmarschall
Feldmarschall
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 30, 2007 1:48 am
Posts: 1051
Location: Washington state
Doc, I've been looking in my reference materials and online about your '61 with 126 inch wheelbase. I wasn't able to turn up specs on '61 Canadian Ford products. However, I see that 1959 and 1960 full-sized Mercurys had a wheelbase of 126 inches (less the Park Lane models, which were 128). Could be yours was built on that chassis. Since there was a lot of commonality in parts between '60 and '61, it wouldn't have been much of a stretch (pardon the pun) to stamp out some panels, etc, that added some inches to accommodate the longer w/b.

My reference to Lincoln was mostly tongue-in-cheek, as it was such a different car from the other lines that it would be difficult not to be recognized as such. Unit body construction, for one thing. Vastly superior vehicle to Ford and Mercury cars of the time.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:20 pm 
Offline
VA-75 Spook
VA-75 Spook
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 6550
Location: Ooooo-Hio
....I just wish I had my father's 1963 Ford Galaxy 500...as a kid I thought that thing was COOOOOOOOOoooooooool... :grin:

_________________
....Naj puška govori!....
.............deplorable typical "bitter clinger"....


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:45 pm 
Offline
VA-75 Spook
VA-75 Spook
User avatar

Joined: Fri Aug 03, 2007 10:46 pm
Posts: 6550
Location: Ooooo-Hio
HerrMesser wrote:
Another car I wish I had kept was a 63 Galaxy convert. A former land lord gave it to as the clutch blew out the bell housing and some ears of the tranny. It was a 260 V8 with three on the tree. Picked up a 64 4 door with 289 and three speed then did a swap. End up trading it in on a gremlen when the first gas crises started.

Rad



.....did you say "Gremlin"...? :-o :ow: :-o

Attachment:
BnW negs-2_0013sm.jpg
BnW negs-2_0013sm.jpg [ 236.8 KiB | Viewed 3586 times ]


.....brand new in 1973 in front of Hangar 122 at NAS Oceana

Attachment:
IMG_0004a.jpg
IMG_0004a.jpg [ 318.52 KiB | Viewed 3586 times ]


....and after I spiffed it up with new wide tires-and mags..... :grin: :grin: :grin: ....that thing was great in the deep snow...!

_________________
....Naj puška govori!....
.............deplorable typical "bitter clinger"....


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 32 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group